Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Real People, Real Stories

By 19th March 2019Financial Help, News
samaritans-debt

Real People, Real Stories

41% of men in England, Scotland and Wales, aged 20-59, do not seek support as they prefer to solve their own problems. This is according to a new survey from the Samaritans. This is backed up by our own data; almost twice as many women reach out to us for help with their debts than men (65% to 35%).

As a result of the data, Samaritans launched a campaign called Real People, Real Stories. The campaign sees men who have overcome tough times share their stories to encourage men, who are most at risk of suicide, to seek help by contacting Samaritans 24/7 free on 116 123 or Samaritans.org.

Paul McDonald, Executive Director of External Affairs at Samaritans, said: “We didn’t want to create just another awareness campaign. We wanted something authentic and emotive from men who have been through tough times, sharing their really powerful, positive and hopeful stories to encourage other men to seek help before they reach crisis point.”

“Our survey results found that although 78% of men aged 20-59 say it’s okay to admit you’re not feeling okay, many still avoid speaking out when they’re finding life tough. A quarter (25%) felt their problems weren’t important enough to warrant calling a helpline, which is one of the reasons this awareness campaign is so important.”

The survey found that some of the main reasons why these men find life tough and struggle include debt or financial worries (36%), relationship breakdown or family problems (30%), loneliness or isolation (29%) and job loss or job-related problems (25%).

If you’ve stopped doing things you usually love, you’re tearful, not eating or sleeping properly, drifting from people close to you, taking alcohol or drugs to cope or self-harming, then please talk to the Samaritans today, or someone you trust.

Call them on 116 123 or email them at jo@samaritans.org

Struggling to Cope?

Signs to look for:

  • Lacking energy or feeling tired
  • Feeling exhausted all the time
  • Experiencing ‘brain fog’, find it hard to think clearly
  • Finding it hard to concentrate
  • Feelings restless and agitated
  • Feeling tearful, wanting or cry all the time
  • Not wanting to talk to or be with people
  • Not wanting to do things you usually enjoy
  • Using alcohol or drugs to cope with feelings
  • Finding it hard to cope with everyday things and tasks
  • Experiencing ‘burn out’

If you don’t see what you’re feeling on this list, please still get in touch.

And if you do think these symptoms sound like you, or someone you know, please still get in touch with the Samaritans on 116 123 or at jo@samaritans.org.

They can also help if you are worried about someone else too.

Samaritans Debt Help